Selling a dream

December 11, 2017

We follow car auctions just to see how certain cars stand up
to pre-auction estimates. We’ll be paying attention in January
2018 when the RM Sotheby’s Arizona sale comes around. There
will be what we consider a rare car there and pre-auction
estimates are between $1.25 and $1.5 million.

The car is Preston Tucker’s personal Tucker 48. A rare car to
begin with as only 51 cars were built by tucker in 1848 before
the company folded. Tucker cars were advanced for the time and
had features many others didn’t.

The third head light in the center turned with the front
wheels, the engine was an adaption of the Franklin 0-355 flat
six aircraft/helicopter engine converted to water cooling. It
had 355 cubic inches, made 166 horsepower and was installed in
the rear of the car.

For a transmission Tucker used an adaptation of the Cord 810/
812 with a Bendix electric shifter. Tucker’s personal car had
a Tucker Y1 transmission, a larger, more improved version of
the Cord tranny.

The car being auction has less than 20,000 original miles.
The vehicle was Preston Tuckers personal car from 1948 to
1955, was then a daily driver of future Arkansas governor
Winthrop Rockefeller, and was in the Francis Ford Coppola’s
1988 film “Tucker: The Man and His Dream”.

When we hear the results of the auction we’ll put them up.
Now we know a little more about this event. Enjoy our Monday
as we’re one step closer to spring.
Comments are always welcome.

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Some bird thoughts

December 5, 2017

A while back I mentioned that if you see a cardinal a loved
one in heaven is thinking about you and decided to take a
closer look this red bird and the myths, legends, and truths
about it. So here are a few things we dug up.

The cardinal was the first designated state bird when in 1926
it was named the state bird of Kentucky. Six other states later
adopted the cardinal as their state bird also.

There is a Cardinals pro football team, pro baseball team, and
college athletic teams. The bird is also the mascot of many
school teams.

The Cherokee believe the cardinal is the daughter of the sun.
Legend dictates if you see a cardinal flying upward, towards
the sun, you will have good luck. But if you see a cardinal
flying downward, toward earth, it is bad luck.

There are even cardinal signals and we’ll cite a few here.
One is its color, cardinal red. This color is symbol of
faith. So seeing a cardinal can be a signal
telling us to keep the faith during hard times.

The cardinal cycle of twelve signifies the cycles of life,
death, and renewal. Regardless of which of the 12 months you
spy a cardinal, it symbolizes the opportunity for restoration
and renewal.

The sound of the cardinal is symbolic of cheer, elevation,
clarity, and communication. Their call can cheer us up, lift
us from depression, and follow the hope in our heart.

Cardinal health is a symbol of strength, readiness, self-
preservation, and vitality. A cardinal sighting suggests our
current diet may not be healthy, we should be prepared to fight
for our health, and that the strength is there to win the
fight.

Now that we know all that I think I’ll stick with the old
standby that says seeing a cardinal means a loved one who died
is watching over us.

Enjoy our Tuesday, We got cold here on the east coast of Iowa,
but it is December. Now I need coffee and a pizza.
Comments are always welcome.


You ever wondered?

November 21, 2017

Yes, this post is late again. But a thought stuck in my head
and a little research is sometimes necessary for me to truly
understand a situation.

I got to thinking about pictures of the earliest cars and how
they all had that tall flat glass. Reasoning that this era was
not known for a population of giants why was the top so high?


from the Model T Ford Club of America

Looking into photographs of the era one notices that if people
are in the shot they are wearing hats. In particular, the men
wore top hats. So I wondered if that had anything to do with
the design of the automobile.


from IFCAR

In the thirties the windshields shrunk as top hats were no
longer in fashion. Fedoras, derby’s, and straw hats were the
rage. These hats didn’t need the extra clearance of the top
hats so windshield height lessened.


unkown


by sicnag

Around the 1950s hats were starting to be phased out as a
daily part of ones wardrobe. And the tops again got lower. Some
of the 1960s vehicles appeared to have taller roofs as the
body height of cars was shortened.


U.S. News

Today there are cars around that I honestly don’t know how
anyone over the age of 20 can even get into. Tne new Camaros
come to mind. While the lower body has gotten taller it looks
like a designer chopped the top.

You may have noticed that the most popular hat today is the
baseball cap. That doesn’t need a lot of clearance, and there
are many who don’t wear any type of hat when it’s warmer out.
And in the winter, a basic stocking cap doesn’t add height.

I haven’t found confirmation of this yet but do believe our
cars were designed around our fashion trends at the time they
were built. If I’m wrong I’ll admit and if I’m right it was
worth the time trying to figure it out.

Enjoy our Tuesday. It means Thanksgiving is only 2 days away.
Now I need some coffee and a couple chocolate doughnuts.
Comments are always welcome.


Armistice Day storm

November 11, 2017

We’ve been told for some time now that climate change is going
to end mankind as we know it. Gloom and doom are predicted. We
seem to forget history along the way, and thus, are doomed to
repeat it. In my lifetime we’ve heard of impending ice ages and
heat waves beyond belief.

None of which came to be. These threats did manage to raise
the cost of certain things while not changing anything. We were
being manipulated then as now. Dad talks about the record
breaking heat wave in the summer of 1937, we’ll talk of another
weather event.

Veteran’s Day used to be called Armistice Day and on November
11th, 1940 a super-storm came through Iowa and other parts of
the country. Global Warming? On that November day in 1940, it
was 58 degrees at 9 am.! Parades were being held in celebration
of the holiday, hunters were in the field, and it looked to be
a picture perfect holiday.

During the local parade the bands wind instruments froze when
the temperature dropped to 33 degrees in about a half hour. The
storm hit the Pacific northwest with near hurricane force winds
and didn’t weaken as it raced east. The storm inhaled moisture
from the Gulf of Mexico and cold air from Canada to become a
super-storm.

The winds that hit that day were called “the winds of hell”
and it is said they reached 70 mph. And then came the blizzard.
Two trains collided, hunters died in the field, boats and
freighters sank on Lake Michigan killing 66 sailors, one million
Thanksgiving turkeys died, and Collegeville, Minnesota
saw 27 inches of snow fall.

The storm tracked from Des Moines to Eau Clair, and the
pressure dropped to around 29 inches of Mercury. When it was
over it was discovered the storm had cut a 1,000 mile wide
path through the middle of our country.

The reason a storm warning wasn’t issued was because the
Midwest headquarters of the government forecaster in Chicago
wasn’t staffed overnight to track the storm. With today’s
advanced technology we hope this couldn’t happen again.

So don’t tell us how climate change is going to cause severe
weather changes and what we have to give up to stop it. Look to
the past for the answers.

Enjoy our Veteran’s Day.
Comments are always welcome.


Two things from Iowa

October 10, 2017

First, if you live in the 6th ward here in Davenport please
take the time to vote today. As you should know, if you live in
the 6th ward, 5 people are running and only 2 can be on the
ballot for the general election.

The other is about and article in the Chicago Tribune from
July 6, 1963. The headline grabbed my attention and I had to
read it. Said headline stated “Iowa Ends 47 Yr. Drouth on
Liqour-by-the-Drink”.

The article is above and can be enlarged by clicking on it,
but what caught my eye was the spelling of drought. I don’t
think I’ve ever seen it spelled that way before, but have heard
it pronounced in that manner.

So I did an online search and one source assured me it was just
another way to spell drought. That made sense in a way but
didn’t really fit. So after more searching the Urban Dictionary
proclaimed it was a Scottish word that meant thirsty. The
latter seemed a better fit.

Since I was only 12 years old when article came out I knew
very little about Iowa Liquor laws or how people got around
them. After reading said article I believe it must have been
a big deal for someone to fly to our Capital just to get the
first liquor license.

It also gave me a chuckle when I came to the part that
mentioned the drink price included a 10% occupational tax. The
tax is probably the only reason our state government allowed
it as the tax would bring in revenue.

I did find it a little hard to believe that our stae didn’t
allow booze to be sold by the drink for 47 years but as the
saying goes, live and learn. One can almost hear the opposition
wailing about how the citizens of Iowa were going to all be
passed out in the gutters because of this.

If memory serves me correctly the drunkest times were in the
mid 1800s when more alcohol was consumed per capita than before
or since.

Now I need more coffee and I spied some leftover pizza that
needs a friend. Enjoy our Tuesday.
Comments are always welcome.


A tragedy and the car show

August 20, 2017

We’re going to show you some of the cars that were at the VVA
Car Cruise-In but before we do we have to mention something that
happened 107 years ago on this date. Bear with us and we’ll get
to the cars.

The Great Fire of 1910 occurred when hurricane force winds
prodded hundreds of small fires into blazing infernos. When
all was said and done 3 million acres were burnt in Washington,
northern Idaho, and western Montana. Two towns in Idaho and
five in Montana were completely destroyed in the fire before
a cold front brought in a steady rain. There were 87 fatalities,
mostly firefighters.

And now some pictures from the car show. You can click on any
picture to get a better look.

There were many more cars, but this should give you an idea
of the show. And now I hear leftover pizza and a coffee pot
calling my name.
Enjoy our Sunday as that means some of us rejoin the rat race
tomorrow.
Comments are always welcome.


Did you know?

August 7, 2017

The two firefighters who lost their lives recently were part of
a Hotshot crew. The crews have 20 firefighters and there are
only about 107 Hotshot crews in the country. They must pass
demanding physical tests followed by mental training. If they
pass the pack test, walking about three miles with a 45 pound
pack on in 45 minutes or less, they move on to more tests.

The crews are on call 24/7 and don’t know where they’re going
when called or how long they’ll be there. They are often dropped
into rugged, remote terrain and then fight the fires with what
they carried in with them.

Those who fight wildfires often refer to a measurement called
chains. A chain is 66 feet long and one of these crews can cut
several chains per hour in a fire line. When they finish for the
day and return to camp about all they want is a hot meal, a
shower, and a place to lay down and get some sleep.

Before 1930 there were no professional wildland firefighters
and people were hired as-needed without any training. The
Civilian Conservation Corps (CCC), began in 1930 and ran until
around 1942. The CCC utilized workers for fire suppression and
thus became the first crews trained to fight wildfires.

The first organized hotshot crews grew out that and some of the
first crews were the Del Rosa and Los Padres Hotshots in 1946 or
perhaps the Del Rosa and El Cariso Hotshots in 1947.

Much respect and a hand salute goes out to all those who fight
these fires, the support groups on site, and everyone who lends
a hand when things get hot. You do not get enough recognition
for the sacrifices you make.

To learn more about one of the recent fallen firefighters, go
to the memorial blog.

For more information on Interagency Hotshot Crews to their
official website.

Enjoy our Monday. That means all evidence of the county fair
will soon be gone and the fairgrounds will move on to other
events. And I might have a pizza.
Comments are always welcome.