Going to be great

April 20, 2017

As the sun went down on another beautiful day in Iowa I hoped
people around the world could view it. So if you didn’t get a
chance to see one where you’re at, we’ll share ours.

Many things happened in our history on this day, April 20th,
which is the 110th day of the year. And that means only 255
more days until 2018. Here are a few of the things that
happened on this date.

In 1826, Major Gordon Long was the first non-Muslim to enter
Timbuktu.

In 1836 the United States Congress passed an act that created
the Wisconsin Territory.

The Civil Rights Act of 1871 became law.

On this date in 1902 Marie and Pierre Curie isolated the
radioactive element radium chloride.

1914 saw 19 men, women, and children killed in the Ludlow
Massacre during a coal miners strike in Colorado.

In 1946 the League of Nations dissolves and gives most of its
power to the United Nations.

And in 1972, Apollo 16 lands on the moon. The mission
commander was John Young.

Adolf Hitler was born on this date in 1889 and Bram Stoker
died on this date in 1912.

If you’re in a mood to party here are some holidays to
celebrate today.

Today is: Lima Bean Respect Day, National Cheddar Fries Day,
National High Five Day, National Pineapple Upside-down Cake
Day, National Pot Smokers Day, and National Look Alike Day to
name a few.

For these reasons, and because I didn’t see my name in the
obituaries, it’s going to be a great day. Enjoy our Thursday.
Comments are always welcome.


Just a thought

April 6, 2017

Today is the 96th day of the year meaning we’ll be adding a
year on forms in just 269 days. Time flies when we’re having fun.
And what a day our Thursday is, did you know…

On this date in 1808, John Jacob Astor incorporated the
American Fur Company and it would allow him to become America’s
first millionaire.

In 1862, on this date the Battle of Shiloh began.

On April 6, 1909, Robert Peary and Matthew Henson reached the
North Pole.

And on this very date in 1917, the United States declared war
on Germany.

Today is a day we celebrate New Beer’s Eve. Never heard of it
you say? It’s the night preceding the day beer became legal
again after Prohibition.

This is the day Merle Haggard was born in 1937 and the day he
died in 2016 at age 79.

There are many more things that happened in our past yet today
is also a day we’re the oldest we’ve ever been. If we woke up
breathing we’re ahead of the game. That’s certainly something
to celebrate. So enjoy our Thursday. We can’t control the
weather but we can learn how to enjoy it.

Now I’m going to watch my talk show on the radio, take a few
pictures, and enjoy the day before I snuggle up with a pizza
later.
Comments are always welcome.


Thoughts of the day

March 23, 2017

Today is Thursday, March 23rd. Since I don’t know if today is
designated as a National Day of Something or Other here are a
few things that happened on this date.

On this date in 1983, then President Ronald Reagan, made his
proposal to develop technology to intercept enemy missiles. It
was called the Strategic Defense Initiative.

This date in 1994 a United States Air Force F-16 collided with
a USAF C-130 at Pope Air Force Base then crashed. 24 U.S. Army
soldiers on the ground were killed in what became known as the
Green Ramp disaster.

A few people celebrating a birthday today include Rex Tilerson
(1952), Moses Malone (1955), Hope Davis (1964), Brandon
Marshall (1984).

Who died on this date you ask? Peter Lorre (1964), David B.
Bleak (2006), Joe Weider (2013), and Ken Howard (2016) to name
a few.

And, after some very intense research we can confirm that
today is National Puppy Day, National Chip And Dip Day,
National Chia Day, National Near Miss Day and National Melba
Toast Day.

There is a lot more that happened today but we thought of
sharing just a few things that we found interesting. Have a
great Thursday.
Comments are always welcome.


Thank you

March 22, 2017

It’s National Agriculture Day today. We find it amazing that
1.5% of our population work in agriculture, but manage to
produce enough food for all of us.

A big thank you to all the farmers, ranchers and others. If
you’ve ever walked the rows or sampled a salt lick, you know
who you are. We think you should have your own month.
Comments are always welcome.


May your…

March 16, 2017

Just as the sun had set I realized today’s post wasn’t going to
do itself. It had been one of those where everything that had
happened was written about it Murphy’s book of laws. Yet there
were some good moments too. And if you didn’t know it, tomorrow
is St. Patrick’s Day.

In the spirit of day, here are a couple toasts.

May the winds of fortune sail you,
May you sail a gentle sea.
May it always be the other guy
who says “this drink’s on me.”

—————————————-

May the lilt of Irish laughter
lighten every load.
My the mist of Irish magic
shorten every road…
And may all your friends remember
all the favors you are owed!

——————————————

And just because I can’t count-

May the saddest day of your future be no worse
Than the happiest day of your past.
———————————–

Happy St. Patrick’s Day.
Comments are always welcome.


Racists? Really?

March 15, 2017

The Stand Your Ground bill has passed to the Iowa House and
the anti-gun group is going to need a safe space. During the
public speaking speaking segment in our capitol, activists were
vocal. They claim gun owners will shoot people in the street,
their children will be shot because they’re the black kids who
wear hoodies, and worse.

Some have even gone so far as to call Stand Your Ground a
modern day lynching bill. And they are welcome to their opinion
on the subject. One comment, however, sticks in my craw. No
name was given to the person who made the comment that
offends me but they said the only people who want the Stand
Your Ground are ‘white, redneck, racists.’

Merriam-Webster describes a redneck as: a white member of the
Southern rural laboring class.

I will not apologize for being born white, or the fact that
I am a redneck. I AM offended being called a ‘racist’. I don’t
have a racist bone in my body, I don’t hate anyone, and
I don’t know any racists personally. That would make you the
racist.

About 10% of the population of Iowa are concealed carry permit
holders now. We went through this when Iowa changed from may
issue to shall issue. When that bill was being discussed the
same people protested and stated that we would have blood
running in our streets if it passed.

You brought the whole dog and pony show to the Capital, and
when it passed, nothing happened. If you feel safe without a
firearm, that is your right. You do not have the right to try
and take mine away or tell me how I can use it.

Enjoy the rest of our Wednesday. We won’t have another one
until next week. And now, I hear a herd of tacos calling to
me. I may just have to have a dozen or so.
Comments are always welcome.


Sad anniversary

February 2, 2017

1-007

Sometimes stories you’ve heard many times get your interest
again and then you look back only to find you had forgotten
more than was remembered. Such is the case as tomorrow draws
closer.

What’s tomorrow? For those who don’t remember we’ll give you
a clue: Don McLean wrote a song about the incident in 1972
called “American Pie” and since then tomorrow has been known
as the day the music died.

On February 3rd, 1959, Buddy Holly, Richie Valens, and J.P.
“The Big Bopper” Richardson died in a plane crash near Clear
Lake, Ia. The pilot also died.

But the previous night they played the Surf Ballroom in Clear
Lake, Iowa in what they didn’t know was their last
performance. Holly, Valens and Richardson left after the show
and went to Mason City to charter a plane. The plane took off
at 12:55 am and not long after crashed.

Waylon Jennings was in Hollys’ band “the Crickets” and was
scheduled to fly along but gave up his seat to Richardson who
had the flue. Tommy Alsip, also with the Crickets was supposed
to be aboard but lost a coin toss to Richie Valens. Alsip
passed away January 11, 2017.

Of course that’s not all that happened on February 3rd so
we’ll add some other things happened on that date.

In 1855 on February 3rd, the Wisconsin Supreme Court declared
the U.S. Fugitive Slave Law unconstitutional.

In 1941 the U.S. Supreme Court upheld minimum wages and
maximum hours.

In 1953 the chimpanzee, J. Fred Muggs, became a regular on
NBC’s Today Show.

And in 1971 OPEC madates a total embargo against any company
that rejects a 55% tax rate.

So if you remember the music you may be humming along right
now and if you don’t perhaps you learned something. At any
rate, enjoy the eve of the day the music died. And now I go
in search of the elusive bacon cheeseburger pizza to see if
it can fill a void.
Comments are always welcome.