Racing to conclusions

Yesterday we mentioned the EPA wants to severely limit
production cars that can be made into race cars and
eliminate some parts used. We feel this move proves
that those in leadership roles have risen above
their competency.

drag1

Every form of racing has influenced the major
manufacturers in ways that would surprise some and
we’ll mention a few here. Things on our daily drivers
that have been taken from race cars include the basic
design of the engine and where the ignition switch
is placed.

The Direct-Shift Gearbox (DSG) is common in today’s cars
yet came from Formula 1 racing. The push button
ignition got its start in many forms of racing.

The suspension of our cars have a racing heritage
with either multi-link or MacPherson struts.

Racing has even influenced how the tires on our cars
are made. The grooves in the tread push water away to
give us better traction and sportier versions may have
less grooves to give more contact on dry roads.

Disc brakes were refined on race cars before becoming
standard on production cars.

Engine air intakes (scoops) had their start in racing.

Aerodynamic styling and the use of wind tunnel
testing is another race technology that made the
mainstream.

Weight reduction. Race cars are light which allows
them to go faster and the car manufacturers utilized
light weight materials to help with fuel efficiency.
Carbon fiber and aluminum come to mind.

The rearview mirror that lets us miss the car in our
blindspot got its start in racing.

Magnesium (mag) wheels are now standard equipment on
some models in the showrooms.

Superchargers and Turbochargers got tweeked in racing
and the technology is still used on some cars today.

Alternative fuels were used in race cars long before
greenhouse gases became a political hotbed.

Even the seatbelts most of use on a daily basis got
their start in race cars. Some say Barney Oilfield had
the first set in his Indycar in 1922.

And if there was no racing these innovations may not
be around today. The EPA should butt out.
Comments are always welcome.

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2 Responses to Racing to conclusions

  1. cruisin2 says:

    Rifleman III,
    thanks for the reblog.

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